A Different World

A full view of The Great Indoors by Aurora Robson.

I apologize in advance for telling you this on such late notice. There is an amazing exhibit at the Rice Gallery and I've only just seen it. Aurora Robson has created a new world inside the Rice Gallery. You might remember the blog I wrote about another exhibit entitled Dans la Lune by Kirsten Hassenfeld. This was another one of those experiences- the kind where every direction I turned there was something new and beautiful to look at. The artist literally transformed the small gallery space into, what I would describe as, a colorful planet in outer space.

Every piece of the 15,000 plastic bottles she collected was used to create something beautiful.

At first, you walk in through a vibrant tunnel, with each section looking unique from the one before. In the center of the tunnel, you come to a small cave, centered around a solar-powered, LED-lit, vivid red ornament resembling the heart of the world. Outside the tunnel are free-hanging configurations that conjure images of alien creatures.


I couldn't get enough of the free-hanging heart within the center of the tunnel.


One of the lavish creatures hanging outside of the tunnel.


According to the artist, her landscape was based on the human body, explaining the warm color palette used. Perhaps the coolest part of the exhibit is the materials she used: recycled plastic bottles. Any green you see is a Sprite bottle. For the ribs of the tunnel, she used only Poland Spring brand water. Most of the plastic is airbrushed with water-based paint giving it an impossibly consistent, tinted look.


A closeup of one of the hanging ornaments. I can only imagine how much time it took to create just one of these detailed masterpieces.

See the Rice Gallery website for more information, but keep in mind that pictures don't do this exhibit justice! If you have time to check it out before it closes on Sunday, October 26th, prepare to be amazed!

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